Sunday, September 9, 2012

War Baby

from an original photo by iMac, with many thanks
I came from a wailing siren:
from bomb-blast air:
from searchlights streaking black-lead sky
as dragon flames burned the stars.

I came from a salt spray wind,
while warships rippled silver trails
through calm seas,
or climbed storm mountains.

I came from a close-knit fear,
from family sardine squeezed into a shelter
where humour blanketed horror
and spread a kind of calm.

Linked to The Poetry Pantry today, and IGWRT on Monday.

20 comments:

  1. Whew, this poem is very evocative, Jinksy. The last two lines express so much emotion!

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  2. Oh, this is powerful in its imagery.. sardines packed into a shelter. Reminds me of tales my mum told us about them having to all hide under a table, and then in bomb shelters in their ack garden during air raids in the 2nd World War.
    Very powerful write Jinksy

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  3. Thankfully I have not experienced war like a close-knit fear ~ I can't imagine living in the nights of siren and flames ~ This is good Jinksy ~

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  4. Doesn't ever leave you, does it?
    I hurt for all the children all over the world today that will carry such a burden for the rest of their threatened lives.

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  5. This is just too good. One of the best I've read today.

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  6. Horror condensed into a little package and handed out with the recognition that laughter provides a kind of calm. Oh My! This is powerful writing, with the refrain of "I came from" showing land oppression, sea battles, and inadequate shelter. The Family is together, perhaps the only blessing--that and survival and voice.

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  7. Oh, Jinksy. This is powerful stuff. (On a MUCH smaller scale...) We had major tornado watches when I lived in Ohio as a child (in the 70s), and I can remember so vividly that fear, and the feeling of wanting to be absolutely prepared for the worst. Which, of course, never came.

    de
    whimsygizmo.wordpress.com

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  8. Thats a slap wrapped in the ugliest of truths. This was really powerful and this subject always seems to make me a little soul sick. Good for writing, bad for humanity..lol. Super good.

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  9. This is a good one. The images very evocative and then the wise truth in the last stanza.

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  10. I love that the family closeness helped ease the terror, Jinksy. How wonderful for a child, during such a time of horror. I consider myself fortunate to have never known war. There hasn't been a war on Canadian soil since 1812, and I'm not quite that old yet. However, you certainly brought the reality of it home to me, so well written, in so few words.
    K

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  11. Very powerful imagery indeed, unique and original.

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  12. humour blanketed horror. I can imagine your parents, protecting you, the oldest children trying to help the younger. Such horrible times...

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  13. wow, Pen! you made me feel like i could really see it!

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  14. This is really good. British humour was probably defined by the war.

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  15. "Humor blanketed horror," an apt phrase for the gallows humor which emerges among those who have seen true horror such as war. This was audacious, vivid; captured the thought of thousands upon thousands of refugees for me. This may tie in for you... Peace, Amy
    http://sharplittlepencil.com/2012/09/05/nurse-in-the-field-afghanistan/

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  16. War remains with someone who has experienced its horror. "humor blanketed horror" laughter can truly helps us through some of the worst times. A fantastic piece!

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